I noticed that the 40lb Ugandan squash had developed a soft spot during it’s extra long time on the vine. In order to reach maximum seed maturity, you should leave it as long as possible so to increase the odds of seed viability. I decided it was time to seed save and harvest the next generation of pure seed before risking the possibility of seed rot within the softened squash. My hunch was right as we can see from the abnormal amount of liquid that spills forth from the squash. The seeds were quite viable as several needed to be plunked into the ground immediately as they had begun to germinate within the cavity of the squash. I am happy to report that those germinating seeds are now tiny seedlings next to the Mother plant.

Here are a couple quick videos to show the short and sweet process of collecting, and cleaning the giant seeds of this extremely rare c.maxima variety.

Written by squash and awe

My love of food and cultures have taken me around the world, dropping me into my current location in Hawaii. I have been loving cooking, photography, gardening, baking, and outdoor adventuring, since back when I was filling a Girl Scout sash with badges. My locations may change, and my activities continue to grow in number, but deep down inside, I still love curling up with a good book, squealing about in a classic car, and making stick-to-your-ribs meals out of homegrown goods.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s