All posts by squash and awe

My love of food and cultures have taken me around the world, which led me to try farming in Hawaii. I have been loving cooking, photography, gardening, baking, and outdoor adventuring, since back when I was filling a Girl Scout sash with badges. My locations may change, and my activities continue to grow in number, but deep down inside, I still love curling up with a good book, squealing about in a classic car, and making stick-to-your-ribs meals out of homegrown food.

Pick the Right Variety

To answer some very valid questions that people have asked me about GMOs in Hawaii.  Yes, GMO squash cross pollinates, and yes it would wipe out what I do. But to look for a solution to squash growing here in Hawaii is to look at the track record of squash varieties. The reason farmers are failing with squash is that they are planting within the family Pepo which is not hearty to any pest, nor to any disease.  Pepo gets absolutely slammed with every disease here, and every pest, so that is why so much spray is normally associated with squash here in the islands. Plant the right varieties, namely family moschata, and your problems are reduced exponentially, and no sprays needed…and bomboocha sized squash are created.

Farm Fact: Reuse

Farm Fact: Reuse is the core of our farming practice. The raised beds are made from raw materials reclaimed from our community. Think creatively when planning your farm or garden. What is in your community? A brewery (for hops/yeast)? A saw mill, or woodworkers business (sawdust)? Tree trimmers (wood chips)? Big box stores (for cardboard)? Think about what normally goes in the dump and see what you can use. Scheduling a pick up time with local businesses lets them stay on task, and allows you to be a help rather than a hindrance.